How To Organize A Compare And Contrast Essay Topics

“I believe that products from Microsoft company are better than goods released by Apple as most of the third-party applications for Apple devices are paid and less popular than those released by Microsoft developers.”

That is one point of view, which is not necessarily correct, but it is an example of how to write a compare and contrast essay. Keep on reading this article. It contains the basic information about this type of academic assignment and a list of the most popular compare and contrast essay topics.

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Students that need more than a list of good topics may hire professional academic writers online to obtain the highest grade without any special efforts.

How to Write a Compare and Contrast Essay?

Before explaining how to write a compare and contrast essay, we will define it. It is a type of academic writing assignment made of multiple paragraphs (5 or more) that interpret different ways in which minimum a couple of subjects are discussed based on their differences and similarities. If the subject is living in the big cities vs living in villages, a student should focus on describing the ways people live in these locations based on similar features (political regime, production, basic problems) and different features (nature, transport, level of life). Comparison stands for the common things. Another part is to describe differences.

An expert explains the importance of thesis statement:

“A thesis statement is a sentence, which informs the reading audience about the chosen subjects and the main argument the writer tries to deliver. What about an example? It could sound this way: “While living in a big city like New York has a few similarities with living in a village, it provides the hustle of many people, various noises, and incredible social opportunities that are different from what a village offers.” The hustle and bustle of city life is the primary thing to focus on in such paper. A thesis statement helps to stay focused”.

Maria Daniels, professor in Colorado University and online academic writer at JustBuyEssay

Basic Paper’s Structure

After choosing several subjects to discuss and writing a thesis, work on an outline. The teachers do not include it in prompts in 90% cases, but it will help. The example of an outline is offered below.

A) Introduction

  1. Hook sentence
  2. Introduction to the broad topic
  3. Specific topic
  4.  Thesis statement

B) Body Paragraphs

  1. Body paragraph #1—Initial factor of the subjects that is similar/different
  • Subject #1 + Detail #1/Detail #2
  • Subject #2 + Detail #1/2. Detail #2
  1. Body paragraph #2—Next factor that is similar or different
  • Subject #1 + Detail #1/Detail #2
  • Subject #2 + Detail #1/2. Detail #2
  1. Body paragraph #3—Final factor that is similar/different
  • Subject #1 + Detail #1/Detail #2
  • Subject #2 + Detail #1/2. Detail #2

C) Conclusion

  1. Summary of main arguments—Reword thesis statement while synthesizing data from body paragraphs
  2. Assess the similarities/differences; discuss future implications (if applicable)
  3. Significance—Talk about the point you are trying to make

Do not forget to format the final draft!

It is time to observe a list of topics. We have divided the list into several categories; it is up to a student to decide whether he/she needs complex or simple ideas.

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100 Best Compare and Contrast Essay Topics for College Students!

Compare and contrast essay topics for college students are describing the life of an average student. Learn here more than 70 cause and effect essay topics. 

  1. High school against college
  2. Humanitarian disciplines vs precise sciences
  3. Spanish vs French classes
  4. School principal or college dean
  5. Statistics vs Accounting
  6. IELTS or SAT
  7. A perfect vacation: Expectations & reality
  8. Being a teen to being a toddler
  9. Camping in the woods or spending a night in a motel/hotel
  10. Luxury way of life against poor living

Easy Compare and Contrast Essay Topics

If you do not want to go into many details, choose one of the easy compare and contrast essay topics.

  1. The main difference between writing an essay and writing a research paper
  2. School exams against college examinations
  3. Homework assignments & in-class work
  4. Summer holidays vs winter holidays
  5. Does it make more sense to study computer science instead of history today?
  6. What are the advantages/disadvantages of traveling alone or with parents?
  7. Is paid education (private colleges) more effective than free (public schools)?
  8. Remote learning vs attending traditional school
  9. Driving a car and driving a bike
  10. Vegetables & fruits: differences/similarities

Compare and Contrast Essay Topics for High School

Students who study at the high school will find this list of the best compare and contrast essay topics for high school useful.

  1. Acting to lying
  2. A good teacher vs a bad teacher
  3. Parental control or full freedom
  4. Being scared of being bored
  5. A female friendship vs male friendship
  6. Facebook or Instagram
  7. Harry Potter: book & movie
  8. Easting fast food against consuming healthy meals
  9. Waking up early or waking up late
  10. Public school vs private school

Compare and Contrast Essay Topics for 6th Grade/Middle School

These 10 compare and contrast essay topics for middle school are simple.

  1. Night time vs daytime
  2. Sleeping vs being active
  3. Running & walking
  4. Summer & winter
  5. Comic books and TV shows
  6. Buffy, the Vampire Slayer vs Charmed
  7. Pokemon & Sailor Moon
  8. Pizza or sushi
  9. Circus vs cinema
  10. Skiing vs swimming

Compare and Contrast Essay Topics for Beginners

Students that are new to the world of academic writing will find these ideas simple.

  1. Marijuana & LSD: differences and similarities
  2. Spring and autumn
  3. The main differences between the Japanese and Chinese population
  4. Do watermelons belong to fruits or berries?
  5. Judo and kickboxing: which one is more aggressive?
  6. Are aliens real or not?
  7. Living in poverty with the one you love against living in luxury with those you hate
  8. iOS & Android: pros and cons of both operating systems
  9. Spending the night at a loud party or staying at home?
  10. How is a car different from a plane regarding traveling?

Compare and Contrast Essay Topics: Natural Sciences

Are you looking for some good natural sciences-related ideas?

  1. Similarities between Jupiter and Saturn
  2. Physics vs anatomy
  3. Fossil & nuclear energy
  4. The correlation between science and technology
  5. Disputable scientific claims
  6. The difference between sun & moon
  7. Is it possible to live on other planets?
  8. Are hurricanes more dangerous than tornados?
  9. Can people apply theories in physics to interpret every life aspect
  10. Which type of natural disaster does more harm: earthquake vs tsunami

Compare and Contrast Essay Topics: Influential People

Talk about famous people who have an impact on the life of humanity.

  1. Mother Teresa & Angelina Jolie: Things that make them alike
  2. John Locke against Thomas Hobbes
  3. George Bush vs Barack Obama
  4. Leonardo da Vinci and Raphael
  5. Joseph Stalin vs Adolph Hitler
  6. Steve Jobs or Bill Gates
  7. Elvis Priestley and John Bon Jovi
  8. Mahatma Gandhi vs Nelson Mandela
  9. Shakespeare & Petrarch
  10. Queen Elizabeth I or Queen Victoria

AP World History Compare and Contrast Essay Ideas + Political Science Themes

History and political science are closely interconnected.

  1. Roman mythology: reality vs legends
  2. Communism and liberalism: comparing
  3. The differences between the Bible and the Quran
  4. Friedrich Hegel against Karl Marx
  5. The way people live in Asia and how they live in Europe
  6. The main difference in the customs & traditions of African society and European society
  7. Was it better back in the 50s or are people happier today?
  8. Contrasting a couple of the most known Russian emperors
  9. Democracy & dictatorship: which one is better in a particular situation?
  10. How are the political regimes different in the United States & the United Kingdom?

Compare and Contrast Essay Topics: Religion

Share various ideas on the sensitive religious subjects, but remain objective.

  1. Judaism vs Christianity
  2. Protestantism & Catholicism: The major differences
  3. Mahayana Buddhism and Theravada Buddhism
  4. Jesus Christ and Buddha
  5. Orthodox Christmas and Christmas in Muslim countries
  6. Differences in customs & traditions of various churches
  7. Comparing a couple of world’s nations based on their religion
  8. Bible & Quran
  9. Secular states and religious states
  10. End of the world in different religions

Things to Compare and Contrast

Discover more exciting subjects to write about.

  1. Ethnic & sexual minorities
  2. Being poor vs being wealthy
  3. Online vs real-life dating
  4. The way people talk to their parents about the way they talk to friends
  5. The 1980s to another decade
  6. Differentiating 2 World Wars
  7. Hard rock vs pop music
  8. Hollywood & Bollywood
  9. Apple company vs Microsoft company
  10. Yoga and Pilates

Compare and Contrast Essay Example

A compare and contrast essay example is something to consider when learning how to write this academic paper. An example will give an overall idea. A student may use it as the template in the future. The internet is full of free examples of various academic papers on numerous ideas, and we included one of the great samples in this article.

Those students who find it difficult to cope with such assignment alone should contact professional online writing team, which offers cheap custom solutions. Do not miss a chance to improve your grade!

TIP Sheet
WRITING A COMPARE/CONTRAST PAPER

A compare and contrast essay examines two or more topics (objects, people, or ideas, for example), comparing their similarities and contrasting their differences. You may choose to focus exclusively on comparing, exclusively on contrasting, or on both-or your instructor may direct you to do one or both.

First, pick useable subjects and list their characteristics. In fact, their individual characteristics determine whether the subjects are useable. After that, choose a parallel pattern of organization and effective transitions to set your paper above the merely average.

1. Picking a subject
Focus on things that can obviously be compared or contrasted. For instance, if you are examining an idea (political or philosophical) examine the opposite of that idea. Or, if you are examining a person, like a president, pick another president for comparison or contrast. Don't try to compare a president and a cab driver, or existentialism and a legislative bill on car tax refunds.

2. Listing characteristics
Divide a piece of paper into two sides. One side is for the first subject, the other for the second subject. Then, begin to list the similarities and differences that immediately come to mind. Concentrate on characteristics that either are shared or are opposing between the two subjects. Alternately, you may construct a Venn diagram of intersecting circles, listing the subjects' differences to either side and their similarities where the circles intersect. Keep in mind that for a balanced paper, you want to make point-by-point, parallel comparisons (or contrasts).

Similarities between my math and English instructors:
Both are welcoming and available to students.
Both are organized and keep a neat office.
Both are knowledgeable and professional.

 

Differences between my math and English instructors
Math teacher listens to classic rock.         English teacher listens to jazz.
Math teacher drinks Earl Grey tea.           English teacher drinks strong black coffee.
Math teacher likes to chat about movies.  English teacher sticks to business.

As you create your list, is it clear why you are comparing and contrasting these two subjects? Do you have a preference for one or the other? If so, make sure you are evaluating each side fairly. A point-by-point list helps you maintain balance.

Once you have a list, decide whether there are more similarities or differences between the topics. If there are more similarities, concentrate your paper on comparing. If there are more differences (or if, as in the example above, the differences are simply more interesting), concentrate on contrasting. If there is a balance of similarities and differences, you might concentrate on discussing this balance.

3. Organizing
There are at least two ways to organize a compare/contrast essay. Imagine you are examining Robert E. Lee and Ulysses S. Grant, both Civil War generals. In your list you have uncovered important points of dissimilarity between them. Those points are their background, personalities, and underlying aspirations. (Call these three points A, B, and C.) You have decided to contrast the two subjects.

Here is one way to organize the body of this paper, addressing points A, B, and C for each subject. This paper will follow parallel order–A, B, and then C–for each subject:

A. Lee's background
B. Lee's personality
C. Lee's underlying aspirations

A. Grant's background
B. Grant's personality
C. Grant's underlying aspirations

However, here is another way to organize the same paper:

A. Lee's background
A. Grant's background

B. Lee's personality
B. Grant's personality

C. Lee's underlying aspiration
C. Grant's underlying aspiration

For a shorter paper, the above might represent three paragraphs; if you are writing a long paper and have a great deal of information, you may choose to write about each point, A, B, and C, in separate paragraphs for a total of six. However you decide to organize, make sure it is clear why you are examining this subject. You might be able to compare apples and oranges, for example, but why would you? Include any insights or opinions you have gathered. And yes, in general, three is the magic number. While there is no hard-and-fast rule that precludes creating a paper based on two points, or four, or five, a three-point discussion is manageable, especially for complex or abstract subjects. At the same time, a three-point structure helps you avoid oversimplifying, especially when addressing controversial topics in which discussions tend to become polarized–right or wrong, black or white, for or against. Three-point treatments encourage discussion of the middle ground.

4. Signaling transitions
Learn to use expressions that precisely convey contrast or comparison. These expressions, or transitions, signal contrast:

  • on the contrary
  • on the other hand
  • however
  • otherwise
  • whereas
  • still
  • yet

These expressions signal comparison:

  • as well as
  • both
  • like
  • in common with
  • likewise
  • also

Signal words such as these help the reader understand the relationships between your sentences, paragraphs, and ideas. In particular, if you are both comparing and contrasting, signal words help sort out what's what. Second only to effective organization, effective use of these expressions will go a long way toward helping produce a good compare/contrast paper.

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